Archaeology / Cultural Heritage / History

[Archaeology] [twocolumns]

Anthropology / Human Evolution / Linguistics

[Anthropology] [twocolumns]

Palaeontology / Palaeoclimate / Earth Sciences

[Palaeontology] [twocolumns]

Evolution / Genetics / Biology

[Evolution][twocolumns]

Traces of large Roman army camp discovered in Velsen, North Holland


Archaeologists from the museum Huis van Hilde found evidence of a large Roman army camp in Velsen – or Flevum in Latin. Evidence of the Roman army's presence was already found in the 1940s, yet archaeologists now discovered that the base was much larger than previously expected.


Traces of large Roman army camp discovered in Velsen, North Holland
Reconstruction of the Roman castellum in Velsen [Credit: Graham Sumner/
Archaeology Museum Province of North Holland]



The site is located near the Velsertunnel and Wijkertunnel. The experts estimated that the Romans built the older camp (Velsen 1) around AD 16 to 28 and the second (Velsen 2) around AD 40 to 50. The second camp is estimated to be around 11 hectares large.


Traces of large Roman army camp discovered in Velsen, North Holland
Coin of Emperor Caligula, found in Velsen [Credit: Archaeology Museum
 Province of North Holland]

It was rare for the Romans to construct large army camps north of the Limes. "The picture of the early Romans in the Netherlands has been made more complex," expert in Roman history at the University of Utrecht Saskia Stevens told the Volkskrant.


Traces of large Roman army camp discovered in Velsen, North Holland
Map showing the location of the two Roman forts - Velsen 1 and Velsen 2
[Credit: P. Vons/Archaeology Museum Province of North Holland]



The camps were large enough to house thousands of soldiers, showing the strategical importance of the site. The Romans also traded weapons and armour in Velsen. They built V-shaped canals to defend themselves against rivals. "If intruders fell inside, it was complicated to get out again," Archaeologist Arjen Bosman said to the Volkskrant. 


Traces of large Roman army camp discovered in Velsen, North Holland
Archive photo showing earlier excavations at the site of the Velsen 1 fort
[Credit: P. Vons/Archaeology Museum Province of North Holland]

The Romans used Velsen as a strategical military point to fight against the Germanic Chauci tribe. They did not succeed, however, in overthrowing the Chauci in the end. The Chacui ultimately united with the Saxons in the third century.


Source: NL Times [November 20, 2021]



Support The Archaeology News Network with a small donation!




TANN

Post A Comment
  • Blogger Comment using Blogger
  • Facebook Comment using Facebook
  • Disqus Comment using Disqus

No comments :


Exhibitions / Travel

[Exhibitions] [bsummary]

Natural Heritage / Environment / Wildlife

[Natural Heritage] [list]

Astronomy / Astrobiology / Space Exploration

[Universe] [list]