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Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia


A new study led by archaeologists from the CNRS, the Inrap, the Ohio State University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, reports on fluted points from the archaeological sites of Manayzah in Yemen and Ad-Dahariz in Oman. Fluted stone tools are a distinctive, technologically advanced form of projectile points, including spearheads and arrowheads. Fluting is a specific technique that involves the extraction of an elongated flake along the length of a projectile point, leaving a distinctive groove or depression at the base of the spearhead or arrowhead.

Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
Stone fluted points dating back some 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, were discovered on archaeological sites in Manayzah,
Yemen and Ad-Dahariz, Oman. Until now, the prehistoric technique of fluting had been uncovered only
on 13,000 to 10,000-year-old Native American sites [Credit: © Jérémie Vosges/CNRS]



Fluting is a distinct technological tradition invented by early human cultures that spread across the Americas. Fluted point technology is very well known in North America, evidenced by finds across the continent dating from 13,000 to 10,000 years ago. As lead author Dr. Rémy Crassard of the CNRS notes, "Until the early 2000s, these fluted points were unknown elsewhere on the planet. When the first isolated examples of these objects were recognized in Yemen, and more recently in Oman, we recognized that there could be huge implications."

Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
Fluting is a specific technique that involves the extraction of an elongated flake along the length of a projectile
point, leaving a distinctive groove or depression at the base of the spearhead or arrowhead
[Credit: Rémy Crassard, CNRS]



The sites of Manayzah and Ad-Dahariz yielded dozens of fluted points. The Arabian examples date to the Neolithic period, about 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, at least two thousand years later than the American examples. As Professor Petraglia of the Max Planck explains, "Given their age and the fact that the fluted points from America and Arabia are separated by thousands of kilometers, there is no possible cultural connection between them. This is then a clear and excellent example of cultural convergence, or independent invention in human history."

Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
Detailed technological analysis, backed up by stone tool experiments and replication by an expert modern
flintknapper, illustrate the similarities between the American and Arabian fluting procedures
[Credit: Jérémie Vosges, CNRS]



The new PLOS ONE article carefully examines the fluted points found in south Arabia. Detailed technological analysis, backed up by stone tool experiments and replication by an expert modern flintknapper, illustrate the similarities between the American and Arabian fluting procedures.

Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
This rock shelter was part of the excavation of the Manayzah site in Yemen
[Credit: Joy McCorriston]



In addition to the similarities, the authors of the new study also investigated the contrasts between the technologies of the two regions. Technological differences were apparent in the nature and location of the flute. The authors emphasize that the 'fluting method' was likely a mental conceptualization of stone tool manufacture, more than just a technical way to produce a projectile and hafting zone. Whereas the apparent function of fluting in the Americas is to facilitate hafting, or attaching the point to a shaft, most of the Arabian fluted points do not have hafting as a functional final aim. The fluting concept and the method itself are the same in both American and Arabia, yet the final aim of fluting appears to be different.

Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
The sites of Manayzah (Yemen) and Ad-Dahariz (Oman) yielded dozens of fluted points. The Arabian examples
date to the Neolithic period, about 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, at least two thousand years later
than the American examples [Credit: Joy McCorriston, OSU]
Arabian and American fluted point technologies were highly specialized stone tool production methods. The PLOS ONE study of Arabian fluting technology demonstrates that similar innovations and inventions were developed under different circumstances and that such highly-skilled and convergent production methods can have different anthropological implications. As discussed in the article, Professor McCorriston argues that "fluting in Arabia was used as a display of skill, rather than serving a purely functional purpose such as hafting, as is more widely accepted in the Americas."

In Arabian prehistory, southern Arabia experienced developments of local origin, with multiple examples of inventions and innovations not culturally transmitted by outside traditions. The fluting method is then a hallmark of this indigenous development in the south Arabian Neolithic.

Source: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History [August 05, 2020]

TANN

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5 comments :

  1. To state that "there is no possible cultural connection between them" and then try to justify the statement seems to be lacking of the scientific method. This presumptive thinking is the reason scientist are constantly eating crow. The disappearance of Clovis in one area then the discovery a slightly refined version of the same technology some time later somewhere else are what you would expect to find.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There really isn't a connection, even superficially. The larger bifacial pieces are "end thinned" but the "flutes" are much longer than Clovis employed. Also, the points are not fluted at all and there is no reduction sequence shown from the bifacial ?s to the finished points, which are stemmed, unlike Clovis. The ages too, are far out synchronization.

      Delete
  2. I see how it is! There’s a connection when the Solutrean points have a vague resemblance to Clovis points, even though there is no fluting at all, and a difference is 6,000 years in age. They even come out with a hypothesis that the Solutreans could even cross the Atlantic Ice with boats with a Inuit lifestyle!! But when Clovis points are found in Arabia in the Mediterranean and they are 3,000-4,000 years younger than the Clovis points in America, and it looks like Native Americans founded Europe and Arabia, then it’s not possible to be a real connection and it’s just convergent technology! What hypocrites!!! The fact of the matter is that the supposed old worlders have Ancient North Eurasian/ Amerindian DNA, but Native Americans have zero ancient European / Middle Eastern DNA!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trans-Atlantic voyages would have been a lot easier in the Antediluvian era; especially if you agree with the scientists who think the Behring landmass was exposed. The Mid-Atlantic ridge would have been exposed in several places making it easier to island hop. The Western Gallic tribes used to describe the Atlantic as a long winding river, which it would have resembled w/the MAR exposed. Plus the Aztlan legends mirror the Atlantis ones enough to have them be referring to the same place; even down to the name of their sunken city (pronounce Atlantis using an ancient Greco-Roman vowel set and Atlan sounds like Atzlan)

      Delete
  3. It is established boats have been around at least 12,000 years and probably much longer. The skill required to make points is indicative of a mental capacity capable of building and useing a hide boat.

    ReplyDelete


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