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3000-year-old burial of female warrior unearthed in Armenia


The remains of an early female warrior were found in the north of Armenia, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology reported.

3000-year-old burial of female warrior unearthed in Armenia
The female warrior was in her 20s when she died and was buried with a 'rich inventory of goods'
including jewellery, experts confirmed [Credit: Khudaverdyan et al. 2019]


The remains unearthed in Tomb N 17 belonged to a woman who seemed to live as a professional warrior and was buried as an individual of rank, the results of the excavations show. The archaeologists suggested that she died in battle around 2,600 years ago. The researchers led by Anahit Khudaverdyan discovered the remains in the in Bover I necropolis in Lori province.

3000-year-old burial of female warrior unearthed in Armenia
Her injuries suggest she was struck in the pelvis by a sword and died in battle
[Credit: Khudaverdyan et al. 2019]


“Exploration of the weapon‐related traumas on human remains allows us to reconstruct the episodes of violence. This paper is an attempt of reconstructing the life and death of a female buried in the Early Armenian necropolis of Bover I (Shnogh, Lori province) based on a multidisciplinary approach integrating archaeological, written and paleopathological data derived from the skeletal analysis,” the abstract of the research reads.

3000-year-old burial of female warrior unearthed in Armenia
Archaeologists also discovered injuries to her thigh likely caused by a long-range weapon
[Credit: Khudaverdyan et al. 2019]
“During our work we identified a rich array of traumatic lesions, which shed light on her daily activities, occupation and warfare practice. We also analyzed a trapped metal arrowhead in her femur. For this region projectile injury to bone, induced by an arrow wound, strongly suggests interpersonal aggression. The same individual also suffered blows to the pelvic bone, femur and tibia. This tomb is the second burial discovered in Armenia that provides evidence on female warriors.”

Source: News Armenia [November 29, 2019]

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