Archaeology / Cultural Heritage / History

[Archaeology] [twocolumns]

Anthropology / Human Evolution / Linguistics

[Anthropology] [twocolumns]

Palaeontology / Palaeoclimate / Earth Sciences

[Palaeontology] [twocolumns]

Evolution / Genetics / Biology

[Evolution][twocolumns]

2018 excavations of the South Palaestra in Eretria, Greece


From August 23 to September 7, 2018, the Swiss Archaeological School in Greece conducted excavations at the South Palaestra of Eretria under the direction of Prof. Karl Reber of the ESAG in collaboration with the Ephorate of Euboea.

2018 excavations of the South Palaestra in Eretria, Greece
Aerial view of the South palaestra seen from the west. In the distance lies Amarynthos
[Credit: Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports]
The public building was first revealed in 1917 by the Greek archaeologist Konstantinos Kourouniotis. The investigations at the monument continued 101 years after the first excavation.


The South Palaestra is located in the south-eastern district of ancient Eretria, near the sanctuary of Isis and the fortifications of the city. It consists of a large square courtyard with a width of about 22m, which is surrounded to the west and south by a stoa forming a corner, and to the north by a large tiered seating area with an internal colonnade. The eastern side is made up of a series of rooms whose purpose is currently unknown. The Sanctuary of Eileithyia is attached to the northwest corner of the building.

2018 excavations of the South Palaestra in Eretria, Greece
The Sanctuary of Eileithyia [Credit: Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports]

The Swiss Archaeological School in Greece conducted 13 exploratory sections to identify material that could further clarify the dating of the building phases of the monument. The excavations revealed that the building has a rectangular ground plan, measuring 23 × 31m, possibly surrounded by three stoas. The masonry and ceramic material associated with the palaestra indicate that it was built sometime in the Classical era and that it remained in use well into the fourth century BC.


In its first phase, the South Palaestra offers important insights into the evolution of Classical structures associated with athletics, particularly in view of the fact that few such structures from this period are known.

2018 excavations of the South Palaestra in Eretria, Greece
Drinking cups recovered from the Sanctuary of Eileithyia [Credit: Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports]
To the northwest of the Palaestra, K. Kourouniotis had brought to light another rectangular structure which, according to the inscriptions, was a sanctuary dedicated to the worship of Eileithyia, the protector of childbirth and children.


Two trial trenches made in this small sanctuary brought to light a well and a 'foundation pit', where about a hundred drinking cups were discovered, dating back to the last quarter of the 4th or the beginning of the 3rd cent. BC.

Source: Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports [October 17, 2018]

TANN

Post A Comment
  • Blogger Comment using Blogger
  • Facebook Comment using Facebook
  • Disqus Comment using Disqus

No comments :


Exhibitions / Travel

[Exhibitions] [bsummary]

Natural Heritage / Environment / Wildlife

[Natural Heritage] [list]

Astronomy / Astrobiology / Space Exploration

[Universe] [list]