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Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome


On the occasion of the European Heritage Days Festival held on Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd September, the Special Superintendence of Rome has reopened two small forgotten Roman jewels, the mausoleums of Fadilla and that of the Nasoni.

Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Credit: La Repubblica


Located 8 km from the Via Flaminia, in the Saxa Rubra area, the "red tufa stone" ofthe hillock that in ancient times ran parallel to the Via Consolare and in which the Romans had excavated rock tombs for family use.

Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Credit: La Repubblica
Among these, the small mausoleum dedicated to the woman Fadilla, a common name in the family of Antonini, discovered in 1923 but then immediately closed, has a mosaic with geometric motifs in excellent condition, surmounted by a vault decorated with squares that contain peacocks, deer, winged genies carrying torches, and wreaths of flowers.


But the real gem is the large family tomb of Quintus Nasonius Ambrosius, which was found during the redevelopment works of the Via Flaminia ordered by Clement X for the Jubilee of 1674.

Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Saxa Rubra Mausoleums reopen in Rome
Credit: La Repubblica


The tomb of the Nasoni is characterized by frescoes of the highest quality, with a cycle dedicated to mythology, where the winged Pegasus, Epiphus and the Sphinx appear, a depiction of the Judgement of Paris, and what appears to be a representation of the Trojan horse.

The paintings are refined, so much so that they were plundered over the years: six frescoes were sold to the British Museum in 1883, three others were removed by the nephew of Clement X for his villa on the Esquiline, while the inscription ended up at the National Museum of Perugia.

The tombs will be open to the public one Sunday every month.

Source: La Repubblica [September 21, 2018]

TANN

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1 comment :

  1. Hope that some day the British Museum will return the fresco to their rightful place in Italy.

    ReplyDelete


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