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4,000-year-old gold-hilted Bronze Age sword found in Scotland


Archaeologists have uncovered what could be a Bronze Age sword dating back as far as 4000 years on the site of a new community football pitch.

4,000-year-old gold-hilted Bronze Age sword found in Scotland
Archaeologists have uncovered what could be a gold-hilted Bronze Age sword dating back as far as 4,000 years
on the site of a new community football pitch in Carnoustie, Angus, in Scotland [Credit: Paul Reid]
Diggers moved into the site in Carnoustie, Angus, after a collection of artefacts were found while laying foundations for the new sports field.

Work to the playing fields has now been halted while archaeologists scour the site.

Early excavations have revealed a trove of artefacts that they believe could date back thousands of years.

On Friday the team discovered what appears to be a sword with a gold hilt dating back to the Bronze Age.

4,000-year-old gold-hilted Bronze Age sword found in Scotland
Excavations at the site have revealed a trove of artefacts 
[Credit: Katielee Arrowsmith/SWNS]
Due to the fragile nature of the find it has to be specially lifted out in order to conserve it for experts to examine in a laboratory.

Chief archaeologist Alan Hunter Blair said: "We're going to try and lift it today by block lifting it. It will be more carefully excavated in lab conditions.

"It looks as though it could be two items. Possibly a spear point or a broken sword. At this stage it's hard to tell.

"We might never know until we get it back to the office and excavate it there. It's a rare find."

4,000-year-old gold-hilted Bronze Age sword found in Scotland
Chief archaeologist Alan Hunter Blair said they have unearthed more than expected 
[Credit: Katielee Arrowsmith/SWNS]
Famed for its golfing heritage, the Tayside town could now cast a new light on how Scots lived as early as 2000BCE.

Mr Blair said: "The volume of material we're unearthing is probably more than what was anticipated.

"Another interesting feature which possibly dates from the Iron Age period looks like a circular structure. It could be that there's been a continuous settlement here."

Source: STV [September 10, 2016]
TANN

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