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Scholar claims to have 'cracked' the Phaistos Disk

The goddess of love, the Minoan Astarte, is the key figure that unlocks the mystery of the Phaistos Disk, according to linguist, archaeologist and coordinator of the program Erasmus of Crete Technological Institute; Gareth Owens.

Scholar claims to have 'cracked' the Phaistos Disk

Speaking to the ANA – MPA news agency, Owens said that after new data found in his research, his theory has changed slightly compared to the position he had expressed about a year ago. The focus is no longer the “pregnant mother”, as originally estimated, but a “pregnant goddess” that takes shape in the face of Astarte, the goddess of love.

“There is no doubt that we are talking about a religious text. This is clear from a comparison made with other religious words from other inscriptions from the holy mountains of Crete. We have words that are exactly the same,” Owens said and added, “I suspect that the Phaistos Disc is a hymn before Astarte, the goddess of love. Words such as those mentioned on the disk have been found on Minoan offerings and as with today’s offerings, people pray when they are troubled, because of health problems or personal reasons. Man doesn’t change, after all.”

The archaeologist said he believes, moreover, that one side of the Phaistos Disk is dedicated to the pregnant mother goddess and the other to Minoan goddess Astarte.

On the importance of the figure, Owens noted that Minoan Astarte was the goddess of love, war and the mountains and her origin lies in the east. “From ancient Mesopotamia, located in today’s Turkey, Astarte went to Cyprus and became Venus,” he said.

Author: Philip Chrysopoulos | Source: Greek Reporter [December 16, 2015]
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5 comments :

  1. “From ancient Mesopotamia, located in today’s Turkey, Astarte went to Cyprus and became Venus,” he said.

    Ancient Mesopotamia... Turkey? Say what? :/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I was thinking. It would have made more sense for him to say "Anatolia."

      Delete
  2. Amazing if it turns out to be true. At least it's not Minos's laundry list!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This may seem small ... but Venus is a Latin goddess. It seems odd to me for any scholar in this day and age to use a Latin name in reference to a Cypriot/Hellenic deity when conversing about something so geographically specific. The Cypriot goddess is Aphrodite.

    ReplyDelete
  4. https://araenil.wordpress.com/2011/06/19/is-the-phaistos-disc-genuine/

    ReplyDelete


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