Mini-robot discovers three chambers in Mexico's Temple of Quetzalcoatl

A robot has discovered three ancient chambers at the last stretch of unexplored tunnel at Mexico's famed Teotihuacan archaeological site on Monday (April 22), the first robotic discovery of its kind in the Latin American country. 

Mini-robot discovers three chambers in Mexico's Temple of Quetzalcoatl
Visitors look on at the archaeological area of the Temple of Quetzalcoatl, near the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archaeological site, about 60 kilometesr (37 miles) north of Mexico City [Credit: Henry Romero/Reuters]
Named Tlaloc II after the Aztec god of rain, the robot was first lowered into the depths of the 2,000-year-old tunnel under the Quetzalcoatl Temple to check if it was safe for human entry. 

Mini-robot discovers three chambers in Mexico's Temple of Quetzalcoatl
A robot used to explore ruins is seen near the entrance of a tunnel [Credit: Henry Romero/Reuters]
After months of exploration, the remote-controlled vehicle has relayed back video images to researchers of what appears to be three ancient chambers located under the Mesoamerican city's pyramid. 

Mini-robot discovers three chambers in Mexico's Temple of Quetzalcoatl
A worker from the National Institute of Anthropology and History walks next to a robot used to explore ruins at the entrance of a tunnel in the archaeological area of the Quetzalcoatl Temple, near the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archaeological site [Credit: Henry Romero/Reuters]
The investigation's immediate goal is to find a tomb where the city's former rulers are thought to be buried. 

Mini-robot discovers three chambers in Mexico's Temple of Quetzalcoatl
Archaeologist Sergio Gomez from the National Institute of Anthropology and History speaks to the media during a news conference in the archaeological area of the Temple of Quetzalcoatl on Monday. A remote-controlled robot has relayed back video images of what appears to be three ancient chambers beneath the temple [Credit: Henry Romero/Reuters]
Declared a UN World Heritage site, Teotihuacan reached its peak between 250 and 500 AD when it had a population close to 150,000 residents to become the sixth largest city in the world after Constantinople and Alexandria. 

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The city has an area of two square kilometres, although scientists believe at it's height, the metropolis reached 20 square kilometres.

Source: Reuters [April 22, 2013]

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